On the Trail

Rest Break on the Upper Dungeness Trail

Over the last 35 years I have gone on a hike into the Olympic Mountains with my friend Jeff nearly every year. It is getting harder for both of us, though… as time catches up with us. We did a shorter hike this year, both in days and mileage, but enjoyed it immensely. I cut enough weight out of my pack … the white one in the image … that I decided to take a heavier camera than my point and shoot. The image quality was well worth it.

  • Camera: Fujifilm GFX-50R
  • Lens: 63mm
  • ISO 125 1/60 sec f/2.8

Royal Creek

Royal Creek

Royal Creek drains Royal Basin … one of the more popular backpacking destinations in the Olympic National Park (reservations required). I was on the bridge over the creek just where the Royal Basin trail starts … about 1 mile up the Upper Dungeness trail. See below for a photo of the bridge. I was bracing the camera on the bridge rail … and shooting various long exposures to get some blur in the water. The problem was the bridge wasn’t nearly as stable as my tripod. Good thing I wasn’t shooting film!

  • Camera: Fujifilm GFX-50R
  • Lens: Fujinon GF 48mm
  • ISO 400 1/6 sec f/22
Bridge over Royal Creek

Canadian Dogwood

Canadian Dogwood

The canadian dogwood is also known as bunchberry. The berries are bright reddish-orange and not edible. The forest floor is brightened up by their presence, since not a whole lot of showy flowers grow in the deep shade.

Camera: Fujifilm GFX-50R

Lens: Fujinon GF 48mm

ISO 800 1/250 sec f/5.6

Forest Canopy

Forest Canopy

It is a challenge getting a good photo of the forest canopy from ground level. I keep trying. The biggest challenge is having the photo give a good impression of the size of the trees. And with taller trees comes even more difficulties of perspective. I’m pretty happy with how this one turned out.

  • Camera: Fujifilm GFX-50R
  • Lens: Fujinon GF 45mm
  • ISO 800 1/400 sec f/5.6

Dungeness River

Dungeness River

Took a hike up the Dungeness River in the North Olympics. This was the view from our lunch spot. What really amazed me about this image was the huge boulder on the left bank that is covered with ferns. I wish I had carried a telephoto lens …

  • Camera: Fujijfilm GFX 50R
  • Lens: Fujinon GF 45mm
  • ISO 800 1/550 sec f/5.6

View to the north from the top of Mt Walker

View from the top of Mt Walker

This view is looking north to the Quimper Peninsula … Port Townsend is on the far end just along the water.

After shooting in the forest under cloudy skies, I turned the ISO down and took this photo. I didn’t pay as much attention as I should have … I was pretty tired from the climb back to the top (I drove to the top and hiked down and back up). I should have paid more attention … I could have dropped the ISO to 64 and still would have been able to handhold.

  • Camera: Nikon D850
  • Lens: Nikkor 58mm
  • ISO 400 1/800 sec f/14

Candystick

Candystick

This is another non-chlorophyll plant, commonly called Candystick for obvious reasons. Latin name is Allotropa virgata.

This was found along the Mt Walker trail in the Olympic National Forest just south of Quilcene, Washington.

  • Camera: D850
  • Lens: Nikkor 58mm
  • ISO 2000 1/25 sec f/7.1

Pinesap

Pinesap

Pinesap (Monotropa Hypopitys) is a plant without chlorophyll, living off the roots of nearby plants for food.

This was on the Mt Walker Trail, in the Olympic National Forest, just south of Quilcene. It was overcast and in fairly dense woods. I had to push the ISO up to 2000 in order to get a reasonable f/ stop to get the depth of field needed to keep the plant in focus.

  • Camera: Nikon D850
  • Lens: Nikkor 58mm
  • ISO 2000 1/60 sec f/7.1

Mt Walker Trail

Mt Walker Trail

I was out for a conditioning hike and the Mt Walker trail is close to home. It is also pretty steep and while it runs to the top of Mt Walker, there is also a road to the top. I drove to the top and hiked down until my knees started complaining about all the steep downhill… then turned around and went back up. On the way up I took photos as a way to take breaks (another good reason to be a photographer!)

One of the frustrations with photos of steep trails is to have them really show how steep the trail is. This photo makes it look like the trail is climbing at a pretty gentle grade. That’s pretty good, since a normal grade trail typically looks flat in a photo.

Mt Walker is in the Olympic National Forest just south of Quilcene in Washington state.

  • Camera: Nikon D850
  • Lens: Nikkor 58mm
  • ISO 800 1/80 sec f/4.5

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