Moonset over the Olympics

The new moon setting over the NE Olympic Mountains

This was October 29th, the moon at about 13.3%. I went out to the county airport to get a clear view to the SW and lucked out with the moon setting over the small patch of the Olympic Mountains visible from that location.

  • Camera: Nikon D-850 with 80-400mm lens set at 400mm.
  • ISO 1250 1/30th sec f/9.0

Crossing a Single Stringer

Crossing a Single Stringer

This was another case of a photo that I originally had rejected. It was underexposed by a whole bunch. Working with it in Lightroom I was able to recover the details in the shadow areas while keeping the light areas from getting blown out. Lesson: don’t give up on an image based on first impressions.

A “single stringer” is a bridge across a stream consisting of a single log … usually flattened on the top and often with a railing.

  • Camera: Fujifilm GFX 50R with 63mm lens
  • ISO 100 1/140 sec f/2.8

Upper Dungeness

Upper Dungeness

I was working on an exercise that consisted of taking photos that I originally rejected and seeing if I could ‘make’ anything of them. This was one of the rejects … the original image was taken by mistake while I was moving the camera and was tilted at about a 45 degree angle. The foreground is a little soft … not sure if it was a camera movement issue or just a focusing issue. I liked the end result, though. It reminds me of the photos I used to take with my old box camera when I was a kid.

  • Camera: Fujifilm GFX 50R with 63mm lens
  • ISO 1600 1/50 sec f/5.6

Upper Dungeness View

Upper Dungeness Valley

The Upper Dungeness valley in the Olympic National Forest is located in the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains. Some areas only receive 1/10th of the annual rainfall that the rainforest valleys of the west side of the Olympics receive. There are also fewer visitors than many areas of the Olympic National Park. (and no daily backcountry use fees, either)

  • Camera: Fujifilm GFX-50R with 63mm lens
  • ISO 400 1/640 sec f/10

Rhododendron Forest

Rhododendron Forest

Hiking the Upper Dungeness trail in the Buckhorn Wilderness in the Olympic Mountains, you pass through an area dense with Rhododendrons. Not sure what makes this particular spot so favorable for them, but it is quite spectacular. And a good example of why the Rhody is the official Washington State flower.

  • Camera: Fujifilm GFX50R
  • Lens: Fujinon 63mm
  • ISO 800 1/50 sec f/11

View to the north from the top of Mt Walker

View from the top of Mt Walker

This view is looking north to the Quimper Peninsula … Port Townsend is on the far end just along the water.

After shooting in the forest under cloudy skies, I turned the ISO down and took this photo. I didn’t pay as much attention as I should have … I was pretty tired from the climb back to the top (I drove to the top and hiked down and back up). I should have paid more attention … I could have dropped the ISO to 64 and still would have been able to handhold.

  • Camera: Nikon D850
  • Lens: Nikkor 58mm
  • ISO 400 1/800 sec f/14

Candystick

Candystick

This is another non-chlorophyll plant, commonly called Candystick for obvious reasons. Latin name is Allotropa virgata.

This was found along the Mt Walker trail in the Olympic National Forest just south of Quilcene, Washington.

  • Camera: D850
  • Lens: Nikkor 58mm
  • ISO 2000 1/25 sec f/7.1

Pinesap

Pinesap

Pinesap (Monotropa Hypopitys) is a plant without chlorophyll, living off the roots of nearby plants for food.

This was on the Mt Walker Trail, in the Olympic National Forest, just south of Quilcene. It was overcast and in fairly dense woods. I had to push the ISO up to 2000 in order to get a reasonable f/ stop to get the depth of field needed to keep the plant in focus.

  • Camera: Nikon D850
  • Lens: Nikkor 58mm
  • ISO 2000 1/60 sec f/7.1

Mt Walker Trail

Mt Walker Trail

I was out for a conditioning hike and the Mt Walker trail is close to home. It is also pretty steep and while it runs to the top of Mt Walker, there is also a road to the top. I drove to the top and hiked down until my knees started complaining about all the steep downhill… then turned around and went back up. On the way up I took photos as a way to take breaks (another good reason to be a photographer!)

One of the frustrations with photos of steep trails is to have them really show how steep the trail is. This photo makes it look like the trail is climbing at a pretty gentle grade. That’s pretty good, since a normal grade trail typically looks flat in a photo.

Mt Walker is in the Olympic National Forest just south of Quilcene in Washington state.

  • Camera: Nikon D850
  • Lens: Nikkor 58mm
  • ISO 800 1/80 sec f/4.5

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