Crossing a Single Stringer

Crossing a Single Stringer

This was another case of a photo that I originally had rejected. It was underexposed by a whole bunch. Working with it in Lightroom I was able to recover the details in the shadow areas while keeping the light areas from getting blown out. Lesson: don’t give up on an image based on first impressions.

A “single stringer” is a bridge across a stream consisting of a single log … usually flattened on the top and often with a railing.

  • Camera: Fujifilm GFX 50R with 63mm lens
  • ISO 100 1/140 sec f/2.8

Upper Dungeness

Upper Dungeness

I was working on an exercise that consisted of taking photos that I originally rejected and seeing if I could ‘make’ anything of them. This was one of the rejects … the original image was taken by mistake while I was moving the camera and was tilted at about a 45 degree angle. The foreground is a little soft … not sure if it was a camera movement issue or just a focusing issue. I liked the end result, though. It reminds me of the photos I used to take with my old box camera when I was a kid.

  • Camera: Fujifilm GFX 50R with 63mm lens
  • ISO 1600 1/50 sec f/5.6

Boulder Shelter

Boulder Shelter

Boulder Shelter sits in the upper Dungeness valley, at the trail junction between the Constance Pass trail and the Marmot Pass trail. It was rebuilt in the ’90’s by a volunteer group working with the forest service.

  • Camera: Fujifilm GFX 50R with 63mm lens
  • ISO 2000 1/400 sec f/5.6

Smith Rocks State Park, Oregon

Smith Rocks State Park, Oregon

The first photo is looking up the Crooked River from the overlook at Smith Rocks State Park, while the second is looking downriver from the trail running down to the footbridge crossing the river. The park is a local rock climbing Mecca and offers some great hiking. Besides the dramatic scenery.

Smith Rocks State Park, Oregon

Camera: Fujifilm GFX 50R with 63mm lens

Morning Mists

Morning Mists at Camp Handy

We were hiking out from our trip on the Upper Dungeness Trail and stopped for the evening. Just after dinner, it started to sprinkle and it continued through the evening. We spent 13 hours or so in our tents.

When we got up in the morning, the rain had stopped and there were wonderful mists on the ridges on the west side of the Dungeness.

  • Camera: Fujifilm GFX-50R with 63mm lens
  • ISO 1600 1/50 sec f/8

Upper Dungeness View

Upper Dungeness Valley

The Upper Dungeness valley in the Olympic National Forest is located in the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains. Some areas only receive 1/10th of the annual rainfall that the rainforest valleys of the west side of the Olympics receive. There are also fewer visitors than many areas of the Olympic National Park. (and no daily backcountry use fees, either)

  • Camera: Fujifilm GFX-50R with 63mm lens
  • ISO 400 1/640 sec f/10

Trail Shelters

Camp Handy Shelter
The Shelter and Meadow at Camp Handy

The Upper Dungeness trail in the Olympic Mountains includes a couple of shelters, one at Camp Handy at 3100 feet and Boulder Shelter up the valley at 4900 feet. Back in the early days, the shelters were built so that hikers didn’t have to carry heavy tents. Nowadays, they are maintained and restored in a joint partnership between the Forest Service and private groups. They are recommended for emergency use only … but if you use them, be prepared to share them with the mice, chipmunks and ground squirrels.

Emergency Food — Boulder Shelter

When we investigated the interior of Boulder Shelter, we discovered a cache of emergency food. The age of the cans was unclear … and it really would be a survival decision to open one. I found them vaguely frightening. I moved one of them (the large one on the left) only to have it start making noises that sounded like it had come to life. Maybe close to the truth.

  • Camera: Fujifilm GFX-50R
  • Lens: Fujinon 63mm

On the Trail

Rest Break on the Upper Dungeness Trail

Over the last 35 years I have gone on a hike into the Olympic Mountains with my friend Jeff nearly every year. It is getting harder for both of us, though… as time catches up with us. We did a shorter hike this year, both in days and mileage, but enjoyed it immensely. I cut enough weight out of my pack … the white one in the image … that I decided to take a heavier camera than my point and shoot. The image quality was well worth it.

  • Camera: Fujifilm GFX-50R
  • Lens: 63mm
  • ISO 125 1/60 sec f/2.8

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